Do you wonder what all of the hacking terminology is all about? Well, this may help you. Hopefully after reading this, you will be more aware of this matter that surrounds our technology and watch out for it. State Bank of Arthur is well aware of these concerns and continue to protect your accounts with the best technology that is offered and human attentiveness.

Spam: Unwanted and unsolicited email and other electronic messages that attempt to convince the receiver to either purchase a product or service, or use that prospect to defraud the recipient. The largest and most profitable spamming organizations often use botnets to increase the amount of spam they send and therefore the amount of money they make.

Cracking: To break into a secure computer system, frequently to do damage or gain financially, though sometimes in political protest.

Denial of Service Attack (DoS): DoS is used against a website or computer network to make it temporarily unresponsive. This is often achieved by sending so many content requests to the site that the server overloads. Content requests are the instructions sent, for instance, from your browser to a website that enables you to see the website in question. Some have described such attacks as the Internet equivalent of street protests and some groups, such as Anonymous frequently use it as a protest tool.

Firewall: A system using hardware, software, or both to prevent unauthorized access to a system or machine.

Keystroke Logging: Keystroke logging is the tracking of which keys are pressed on a computer (and which touchscreen points are used). It is, simply, the map of a computer/human interface. It is used by gray and black hat hackers to record login IDs and passwords. Keyloggers are usually secreted onto a device using a Trojan delivered by a phishing email.

Malware: A software program designed to hijack, damage, or steal information from a device or system. Examples include spyware, adware, rootkits, viruses, keyloggers, and many more. The software can be delivered in a number of ways, from decoy websites and spam to USB drives.

Phishing: Tricking someone into giving you their personal information, including login information and passwords, credit card numbers, and so on, by initating legitimate companies, organizations, or people online. Phishing's often done via fake emails or links to fraudulent websites.

Social Engineering: A Custodian is to a janitor as a social engineer is to a con man. Social engineering is conning people into giving you confidential information, such as passwords to their accounts. Given the difficulty of breaking, 128-bit encryption with brute force, for example, social engineering is an integral element of cracking. Examples include phishing and spear-phishing.

Spoofing: Email spoofing is altering the header of an email so that it appears to come from elsewhere. A black hat hacker, for instance, might alter his email header so it appears to come from your bank. IP spoofing is the computer version, in which a packet is sent to a computer with the IP altered to imitate a trusted host in the hope that the packet will be accepted and allow the sender access to the target machine.

Spyware: Spyware is a typ of malware that is programmed to hide on a target computer or server and send back information to the master server, including login and password information, bank account information, and credit card numbers. Virus: Self-replicating malware that injects copies of itself in the infected machine. A virus can destroy a hard drive, steal information, log keystrokes, and many other malicious activities.

Worm: Self-replicating, standalone malware. As a standalone it does not report back to a master, and unlike a virus it does not need to attach itself to an existing program. It often does no more than damage or ruin the computers it is transmitted to. But it's sometimes equipped with a payload, usually one that installs back doors on infected machine to make a botnet.

Adware: Adware can mean the software that automatically generated advertisements in a program that is otherwise free, such as an online video game. But in this context it more commonly means a kind of spyware that tracks yor browsing habits covertly to generate those ads.

Back Door: A back door, or trap door, is a hidden entry to a computing device or software that bypasses security measures, such as logins and password protections. Malware is often designed to exploit back doors.

Black Hat: Black hat hackers are those who engage in hacking for illegal purposes, often for financial gain, though also for notoriety. Their hacks and cracks result in inconvenience and loss for both the owners of the system they hack and the users.

Bot: A program that automates a usually simple action so that it can be done repeatedly at a much higher rate for a more sustained period than a human operator could do it. Like most things in the world of hacking, bots are, in themselves, benign and used for a host of legitimate purposes, like online content delivery. However, they are often used in conjunction with cracking, and that's where its public notoriety comes from. Bots can be used, for instance to make the content calls that make up denial of service attacks. Bot is also a term used to refer to the individual hijacked computers that make up a botnet.

Brute Force Attack: Also known as an exhaustive key search, a brute force attack is an automated search for every possible password to a system. It is an inefficient method of hacking compared to others like phishing. It's used usually when there is no alternative. The process can be made shorter by focusing the attack on password elements likely to be used by a specific system.

Trojan Horse: A Trojan is a type of malware that masquerades as a desirable piece of software. Under this camouflage, it delivers its payload and usually installs a back door in the infected machine.

 

Phone Scam

The FCC is warning consumers about a scam that is hooking consumers with just one word: Yes
The scam begins as soon as a person answers the phone. A recorded voice or an actual person asks: "Can you hear me?" And the consumer answers "Yes."
The caller then records the consumer's 'Yes' response and thus obtains a voice signature. This signature can later be used by the scammers to pretend to be the consumer and authorize fraudulent charges via telephone.

4 Tips:

1. Don't answer calls from unknown numbers. Let it go to voicemail.

2. If you answer and the caller asks you to hit a button to stop receiving calls, just hang up.

3. If you receive a scam call, write down the number and file a compliant with the FCC.

4. Register all of your telephone numbers in the National Do Not Call Registry.

Do you wonder what all of the hacking terminology is all about? Well, this may help you. Hopefully after reading this, you will be more aware of this matter that surrounds our technology and watch out for it. State Bank of Arthur is well aware of these concerns and continue to protect your accounts with the best technology that is offered and human attentiveness.

Spam: Unwanted and unsolicited email and other electronic messages that attempt to convince the receiver to either purchase a product or service, or use that prospect to defraud the recipient. The largest and most profitable spamming organizations often use botnets to increase the amount of spam they send and therefore the amount of money they make.

Cracking: To break into a secure computer system, frequently to do damage or gain financially, though sometimes in political protest.

Denial of Service Attack (DoS): DoS is used against a website or computer network to make it temporarily unresponsive. This is often achieved by sending so many content requests to the site that the server overloads. Content requests are the instructions sent, for instance, from your browser to a website that enables you to see the website in question. Some have described such attacks as the Internet equivalent of street protests and some groups, such as Anonymous frequently use it as a protest tool.

Firewall: A system using hardware, software, or both to prevent unauthorized access to a system or machine.

Keystroke Logging: Keystroke logging is the tracking of which keys are pressed on a computer (and which touchscreen points are used). It is, simply, the map of a computer/human interface. It is used by gray and black hat hackers to record login IDs and passwords. Keyloggers are usually secreted onto a device using a Trojan delivered by a phishing email.

Malware: A software program designed to hijack, damage, or steal information from a device or system. Examples include spyware, adware, rootkits, viruses, keyloggers, and many more. The software can be delivered in a number of ways, from decoy websites and spam to USB drives.

Phishing: Tricking someone into giving you their personal information, including login information and passwords, credit card numbers, and so on, by initating legitimate companies, organizations, or people online. Phishing's often done via fake emails or links to fraudulent websites.

Social Engineering: A Custodian is to a janitor as a social engineer is to a con man. Social engineering is conning people into giving you confidential information, such as passwords to their accounts. Given the difficulty of breaking, 128-bit encryption with brute force, for example, social engineering is an integral element of cracking. Examples include phishing and spear-phishing.

Spoofing: Email spoofing is altering the header of an email so that it appears to come from elsewhere. A black hat hacker, for instance, might alter his email header so it appears to come from your bank. IP spoofing is the computer version, in which a packet is sent to a computer with the IP altered to imitate a trusted host in the hope that the packet will be accepted and allow the sender access to the target machine.

Spyware: Spyware is a typ of malware that is programmed to hide on a target computer or server and send back information to the master server, including login and password information, bank account information, and credit card numbers. Virus: Self-replicating malware that injects copies of itself in the infected machine. A virus can destroy a hard drive, steal information, log keystrokes, and many other malicious activities.

Worm: Self-replicating, standalone malware. As a standalone it does not report back to a master, and unlike a virus it does not need to attach itself to an existing program. It often does no more than damage or ruin the computers it is transmitted to. But it's sometimes equipped with a payload, usually one that installs back doors on infected machine to make a botnet.

Adware: Adware can mean the software that automatically generated advertisements in a program that is otherwise free, such as an online video game. But in this context it more commonly means a kind of spyware that tracks yor browsing habits covertly to generate those ads.

Back Door: A back door, or trap door, is a hidden entry to a computing device or software that bypasses security measures, such as logins and password protections. Malware is often designed to exploit back doors.

Black Hat: Black hat hackers are those who engage in hacking for illegal purposes, often for financial gain, though also for notoriety. Their hacks and cracks result in inconvenience and loss for both the owners of the system they hack and the users.

Bot: A program that automates a usually simple action so that it can be done repeatedly at a much higher rate for a more sustained period than a human operator could do it. Like most things in the world of hacking, bots are, in themselves, benign and used for a host of legitimate purposes, like online content delivery. However, they are often used in conjunction with cracking, and that's where its public notoriety comes from. Bots can be used, for instance to make the content calls that make up denial of service attacks. Bot is also a term used to refer to the individual hijacked computers that make up a botnet.

Brute Force Attack: Also known as an exhaustive key search, a brute force attack is an automated search for every possible password to a system. It is an inefficient method of hacking compared to others like phishing. It's used usually when there is no alternative. The process can be made shorter by focusing the attack on password elements likely to be used by a specific system.

Trojan Horse: A Trojan is a type of malware that masquerades as a desirable piece of software. Under this camouflage, it delivers its payload and usually installs a back door in the infected machine.

 

Phone Scam

The FCC is warning consumers about a scam that is hooking consumers with just one word: Yes
The scam begins as soon as a person answers the phone. A recorded voice or an actual person asks: "Can you hear me?" And the consumer answers "Yes."
The caller then records the consumer's 'Yes' response and thus obtains a voice signature. This signature can later be used by the scammers to pretend to be the consumer and authorize fraudulent charges via telephone.

4 Tips:

1. Don't answer calls from unknown numbers. Let it go to voicemail.

2. If you answer and the caller asks you to hit a button to stop receiving calls, just hang up.

3. If you receive a scam call, write down the number and file a compliant with the FCC.

4. Register all of your telephone numbers in the National Do Not Call Registry.